Negotiation and Dispute Resolution Book Reviews and Links

Introductory Books
There are some books that are useful introductions to the field of dispute resolution.  Some you need to read because "everyone else" has read them.  Some are just good, basic books.
Basic Literacy Books
  • Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In. Fisher, Roger, and William Ury, with Bruce Patton, ed. Second edition. New York: Penguin Books.  Everyone has read it.
    Link to Barnes & Noble
  • Getting Past No: Negotiating With Difficult People. Ury, William. New York: Bantam Books, 1991.
    Link to Barnes & Noble

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Good Introductory Books

  • A Practical Guide to Negotiation, Thomas F. Guernsey.  NITA (Notre Dame).  Reading the footnotes and being familiar with the sources, in many ways this book is not much more than a revisit of Gerald Williams and Getting to Yes in one volume. But, it is also much more.  It reads clearly. It has a strong context.  It does not take the easy way out.  It provides an excellent framework.  In many ways, the book is much better than the sources.  An excellent place to begin.
    Link to Barnes & Noble
  • Finding Common Ground, A Field Guide to Mediation by Barbara Ashley Phillips, would make an excellent text for an introductory course on mediation for college freshman.  $16.95, 222 pages, published by Hells Canyon Publishing of Austin, Texas 541-742-6285.
    Link to Barnes & Noble
  • Mediator's Handbook Neighborhoods.  A supplemental text by Beer with Stief.
    Link to Barnes & Noble

More Mediation & Dispute Resolution Books
These books are good mediation and dispute resolution books.
  • Mediation and Facilitation Training Manual, Mennonite Conciliation Service.  This is "everything else" that is out there once you get away from "court annexed" ADR procedures.  Where mediation started and where dispute resolution continues to go.
    Link to Barnes & Noble
  • The American Arbitration Association Insurance ADR Manual.  Written in "standard" legal style, this book sets out the AAA's approach and rules clearly for each type of insured claim ADR may be applied to.
    Link to Barnes & Noble
  • The Roleplay Book, edited by Ron Mock, Mennonite Conciliation Service.  41 well executed roleplays, from simple to complex.
    Link to Barnes & Noble
  • Dealing with an Angry Public by Larry Suskind. Excellent book on dealing with large, angry groups of people.  There are no magic bullets or easy solutions, but there are solid and useful skills and tools for honest attempts to resolve issues successfully.
    Link to Barnes & Noble
  • Legal Negotiation and Settlement by Gerald Williams. (West Publishing Company 1983) (ISBN 0314680934). The one Williams book in print.
    Link to Barnes & Noble
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Conceptual and Cutting Edge Material
There are books that are not directly about mediation ... but ... they either have cutting edge material in them, or, they take a different approach to a standard dispute resolution tool.  If you want to get ahead of the game, these are books you should read.
  • The Handbook of Experimental Economics, John H. Kagel and Alvin E. Roth.
  • A Course in Microeconomic Thoery D. Kreps.
  • Co-opetition, Adam M. Brandenburger and Barry J. Nalebuff.
  • Game Theory and the Law, Douglas G. Baird, Robert H. Gertner.
  • Thinking Strategically by A. Dixit and B. Nalebuff.
  • Game Theory with Economic Applications by H. Bierman and L. Fernandez.
  • Fun and Games: A Text on Game Theory by K. Binmore.
  • Game Theory:  Analysis of Conflict by R. Myerson.
  • Game Theory by D. Fundenberg and J. Tirole.
  • Conceptual Selling by Robert B. Miller and Stephen E. Heiman.  This book teaches needs based negotiating on a nuts and bolts level (with a clear conceptual overview) for people in sales.  Most job seekers should read the first two or three chapters.  Any mediator who has been told he or she talks too fast should read the section at page 110 on "Golden Silence" and the section at page 115 on verbal patterns to avoid -- including excellent choices of words to use in place of "why." Conceptual
    Selling
    Link to Barnes & Noble
  • Why Smart People Do Dumb Things, by Mortimer Feinberg and John J. Tarrant.  The authors miss the seductive power of synchronistic thinking as a force for stupidity, but otherwise catch many, many sources of conflict and trouble.  Reading this book can help you understand why organizations have gone off-track away from win-win directions.
  • The Dilbert Principle, by Scott Adams.  This book is a strong source of insight into Corporate America that just is not available any other place.  Be aware that Adams has a fierce hatred for H.R. directors which is strongly displayed in his later works.
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Catherine Morris' Bibliography

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